Mr. Darcy's Diary
by Maya Slater

Darcy's Diary by Slater

amazon.com
Paperback - 256 pages
(October 17, 2007) Phoenix;
ISBN: 0753822660, 978-0753822661
amazon.co.uk
Paperback - 256 pages
(17 Oct 2007) Phoenix;
ISBN: 0753822660, 978-0753822661
amazon.ca
Paperback - 256 pages -
(Nov 1 2007) McArthur & Co / Orion Con Trade;
ISBN: 0753822660, 978-0753822661

       Written by LynneRobson (11/28/2007 3:01 p.m.)
SPOILERS
I have just finished reading the above. I did not really like the idea though of Wickham forcing himself on Georgiana and her brother finding them together in bed at the Inn and not doing anything about it except offer Wickham an income to make him keep his mouth shut. I think that if it had happened that way Darcy would have killed him or maimed him in some way. If he had not done so I think that the Colonel would have done so. There were a few other things I did not like either she made Caroline Bingley out to be the one who did not want to treat Jane deceitfully as she liked her. I can understand the reasoning behind his separation of Bingley and Jane after hearing about the letter Sgnt Tully thought she had written to him and other soldiers of clandestine meetings etc.

I liked the way she made him into a passionate man doing things most of the Regency bucks did, but not a rake. Most writers make him to be innocent and chaste which is impossible in those days. All in all I enjoyed the diary and found it to be a good read but I must admit that I preferred Amanda Grange's version to this one.


       Written by Kathleen Glancy (12/4/2007 10:28 a.m.)
SPOILERS
I agree entirely that Darcy would probably have called Wickham out, if he didn't simply do his best to beat him to death on the spot. I particularly did not like this alteration in the plot because it makes Darcy purposely lie to Elizabeth in his letter, and he does not (apparently) ever tell her the truth even after their engagement. I found the whole "Darcy thinks Jane writes saucy letters to soldiers" completely unacceptable. I assume the author is trying to give him an excuse for his interference, but it is at the expense of his judgement - he has been in company with Jane often, he has seen the modest and dignified way she behaves, he knows (going on the letter again) that her character is admired in the neighborhood - only an idiot would harbour suspicions of her character. Darcy, in the book, never does - he thinks she does not love Bingley, but that is a far cry from thinking she would run after anything ina red coat. Furthermore he knows she has two sisters who do exactly that,yet apparently he never considers the possibility that the letters emanate from one of them.

I was not that struck on the maid-tumbling and taking part in orgies (though with the saving grace that he finds it all rather silly) with Lord Byron either.

What I did like was the portrayal of his empathy for Lydia - he seems genuinely sorry for her, and when you consider that she will suffer the fate from which his sister escaped only be good luck (more narrowly in this book than in the original) I can well believe that he did feel pity for her.

If you want to rate the various diaries, confessions et al I preferred Mary Street's, Amanda Grange's and Pamela Aidan's versions to this one - but it was much better than Marjorie Fasman's, having few historical howlers.